STEAM2 Outdoor Education

 

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During the summer of 2017, the Laurel Hill School, in conjunction with Nature Explore, created an expansive Outdoor Classroom on our beautiful wooded campus.  We are so excited that LHS is providing our children with the advantages and opportunities afforded by outdoor inspired learning.

The LHS outdoor syllabus includes nature and ecology, math, language arts, social studies, and science, as well as new STEM programs in technology and engineering.  Now add an “A” to STEM and square the “M,” and LHS has achieved Art and Music, with all its correlates, in its better-described, “STEAM2 Outdoor Classroom.”  For Middle School students, architecture is also included in STEAM2!  We are confident that outdoor education will be a rewarding and successful experience for our students and faculty.

Research has documented increased school performance through outdoor education, including improved personal engagement and incentives to learn, increased test scores, and overall enhanced achievement in all core subjects. In addition, studies show children who participate in outdoor education develop increased independence, confidence, creativity, decision-making and problem solving skills, empathy, self-discipline and initiative. Finally, outdoor learning and access to nature decreases stress levels in students and teachers.

Learn More about the Benefits of Outdoor Learning:

Outdoor Education – Research Summary | Compiled by Wisconsin’s K-12 Forestry Education Program, The LEAF Program

Back to School: Back Outside! Create High Performing Students| National Wildlife Federation

VIDEO: CBS This Morning Interviews Richard Louv about the real cutting edge of education

A Potential Natural Treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Evidence From a National Study | American Journal of Public Health

Outdoor learning ‘boosts children’s development’ | BBC News, July 15, 2016

Outdoor learning: Education’s next revolution? | Salon, February 16, 2014

‘Nature Is a Powerful Teacher’: The Educational Value of Going Outside | The Atlantic, October 31, 2013